Primitive Archer items and books presented by Horsefeathers Ranch to meet all your archery needs.

  • A Leading Expert on Traditional Archery Offers Insight Into How the Longbow Was Drawn from Medieval Sources to Modern Recreations “Soar’s book [The Crooked Stick] is indispensible.”―Bernard Cornwell, New York Times bestselling author. Relying on more than fifty years’ experience in archery, historian Hugh D. H. Soar reflects on how the longbow was drawn and shot across the centuries through examining the design of the bow and early literature about the bow, combined with his and his colleagues’ applied knowledge using replica bows. No complete medieval longbow has survived, but those found aboard the Tudor warship Mary Rose provide the best archaeological evidence to the possible construction of the medieval bow. Contemporary treatises written about the proper manner of shooting the bow, together with the resurgence in interest and construction of replica bows beginning in the late sixteenth century that form part of the author’s collection provide the basis for this work. How to Shoot the Longbow: A Guide from Historical and Applied Sources is a fascinating and practical look at the use of a legendary invention
  • In this book, the author describes the transition from hand-thrown spear to bow-launched arrow and then follows the arrow's developments in cultures around the world and across time,. The book describes arrows found in Neolithic sites; those used by North and South American Indians–including a discussion of poison-tipped arrows; arrows used in China, Japan and Mongolia; and finally the arrow in Europe, where it was successfully paired with the longbow during the Middle Ages. The author completes his survey with the changes in technology introduced during the 20th century through the use of the alloy of aluminum with other light-weight metals and synthetic materials to construct part of the arrow.
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    • All-purpose guide to utilizing your deer after the kill
    • Detailed instructions on field dressing and butchering
    • Varied recipes for venison plus tips on do-it-yourself taxidermyYou've braved the elements, spent hours lying in wait, and had your share of near misses, but you've finally bagged that prize whitetail or mule deer. Now what? In this wide-ranging guide, Dennis Walrod tells you everything you need to know to maximize the use of your deer. In addition to essential instruction on field dressing and transport, the author goes on to cover salting and tanning hides, aging venison, leathercrafting, soapmaking, trophy mounting, and creating home furnishings and decorations. Also included is a selection of mouthwatering venison recipes, making this an indispensable resource for any hunter looking to extend the hunting experience beyond the moment of the kill.
     
  • Product Description: • Easy-to-understand instruction for traditional archery • Covers both target shooting and bowhunting • Includes the author's exclusive tiered training program for instinctive shooting with in-depth advice on selecting bows, arrows, and accessories The popularity of traditional archery has exploded in recent years, and this handy, readable guide serves as the perfect introduction for anyone looking to break into the sport. From selecting arrow shafts to refining your form to entering your first tournament, it explains in straightforward, no-nonsense prose how to get started. About the Author: Brian J. Sorrells is a long-time bowhunter and target shooter whose writing appears regularly in the magazines Bowhunter and Traditional Bowhunter.
  • In The Crooked Stick: A History of the Longbow, historian Hugh D. H. Soar pulls together all of these strings, presenting the engaging story of this most charismatic standoff weapon. Through a remarkable command of manuscript and printed sources and a judicious use of material evidence, including his own important collection of rare longbows, Hugh Soar establishes the deep connections of this bow to England, Scotland, and Wales. Figures in the past like William Wallace, Edward III, and Henry V appear alongside detailed descriptions of bows, strings, arrows, and arrowheads, while the rise of institutions and craftsmen devoted to the longbow are presented to show how knowledge of this weapon was carried forward across the centuries.
  • In a tradition extending back for centuries, and eventually becoming part of English law, all boys were to be provided with a bow and two arrows at the age of six to begin archery training. When the longbow gave way to firearms in the sixteenth century, the ancient statute was relaxed. At that point, rather than disappear, the longbow began a new life as the centerpiece of recreational archery. Quickly abandoned by villagers, the longbow found itself in the hands of gentlemen who formed social clubs around the bow. These clubs and societies of the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries—tightly regulated by social distinction—offered members an opportunity to meet their peers in pleasant concourse. Target and range competitions were natural events at club functions, but roving also became popular, with archers walking across vast swathes of open estate country following their arrows in golflike fashion. Initially men-only, archery clubs in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries began accepting women members. It was then, as Hugh Soar relates in The Romance of Archery: A Social History of the Longbow, that the longbow literally became an arm of cupid, with recreational archery providing a setting for prospective partners to meet in a socially acceptable environment, a ritual known from the time of Jane Austen to Edith Wharton. With the participation of women, the longbow opened up another phase in its centuries-old career, with women welcome to shoot in the Olympic Games. With his characteristic blend of erudition and wit, Hugh D. H. Soar leads the reader on a fascinating journey through the latter history of the venerable longbow. HUGH D. H. SOAR, a leading expert on the longbow, is author of many articles and books on archery, including "The Crooked Stick: A History of the Longbow" and (with Mark Stretton and Joseph Gibbs) "Secrets of the English War Bow".  
  • A period of stability in the early sixth century AD gave the Eastern Roman emperor Justinian an opportunity to recapture parts of the Western Empire which had been lost to invading barbarians in the preceding centuries. It was an ambitious plan to attack such a vast territory with relatively few soldiers and resources. Yet Justinian’s army succeeded in checking the Persians in the East and in retaking North Africa from the Vandals and Italy from the Ostrogoths, the strongest and most organized Barbarian tribe in the West. The climactic conflict over Italy between 535 and 554—the Gothic War—decided the political future of Europe, holding in its balance the possibility that the Roman Empire might rise again. While large portions of the original territory of the ancient Roman Empire were recaptured, the Eastern Empire was both unwilling and incapable of retaining much of its hard-won advances, and soon the empire once again retracted. As a result of the Gothic War, Italy was invaded by the Lombards who began their important kingdom, the Franks began transforming Gaul into France, and without any major force remaining in North Africa, that territory was quickly overrun by the first wave of Muslim expansion in the ensuing century. Written as a general overview of this critical period, The Gothic War opens with a history of the conflict with Persia and the great Roman general Belisarius’s successful conquest of the Vandals in North Africa. After an account of the Ostrogothic tribe and their history, the campaigns of the long war for Italy are described in detail, including the three sieges of Rome, which turned the great city from a bustling metropolis into a desolate ruin. In addition to Belisarius, the Gothic War featured many of history’s most colorful antagonists, including Rome’s Narses the Eunuch, and the Goths’ ruthless and brilliant tactician, Totila. Two appendices provide information about the armies of the Romans and Ostrogoths, including their organization, weapons, and tactics, all of which changed over the course of the war. TORSTEN CUMBERLAND JACOBSEN is a former curator of the Royal Danish Military Museum.